Did you know that you can only take beautiful photos with a smartphone? This is real. While smartphone photography may seem difficult, it’s actually easy – as long as you know a few tricks. That’s where this article comes in; I’ll give you some simple tips to help you take stunning, beautiful, and memorable phone photos in no time. I’ve also included a number of smartphone image examples so you can see exactly what your little phone camera is capable of.




let’s start!
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1. Clean your lens

This trick is pretty simple, but you’ll be surprised how much dirt builds up on your smartphone lens. When I reach for my phone, I often find a lot of smudges and grime caused by my kids, my bag, the environment, etc. So do yourself a favor and get into the habit of quickly wiping down your phone’s lens before you start taking pictures. It will make your photos look sharper!
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2. Tap the screen to set focus

When you point your smartphone at a subject, the camera usually guesses what you’re shooting. For example, when it detects a face, it focuses on the face; when it recognizes a person, it focuses on the person. This method of autofocus works well, especially when shooting sharp scenes with clearly dominant subjects. However, if the scene is more complex—for example, you’re photographing a bird surrounded by trees—your smartphone may be out of focus and the footage will become blurry.

so what are you doing?

Instead of letting your smartphone’s algorithm determine your focus, just tap your subject and – voila! – You will get a sharp result.
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3. Don’t use flash

Your smartphone camera has a flash…

…but it really, really sucks! Sorry – there’s no way to whitewash it: whether you’re shooting day, late night, landscapes, flowers, or portraits.

your phone camera’s flash isn’t great for taking pictures. So when you take pictures, turn off the flash. Instead, use natural light for great results. For example, capture beautiful golden lights in the early morning or evening, or soft, evenly lit images on a cloudy day.
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4. Manually set the image brightness

Did you know you can manually adjust image brightness (ie image exposure)?

Indeed, you can use this feature to control the level of detail shown in the final photo. Details depend on your specific smartphone model, but try tapping the screen and looking for some sort of exposure icon (like the sun).

Swipe up (or drag the appropriate slider) to lighten the exposure, and swipe down (or drag the appropriate slider) to darken it. Note that the overall goal is to get as much detail as possible in the final image. However, you can also selectively lighten or darken the image for creative effects.
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5. Compose your photos creatively

Composition refers to the arrangement of elements in a frame. If you want to take impressive photos, you need to position people and objects carefully and attractively.

Some quick advice:

Avoid placing your subject in the very center of the frame Symmetry usually looks good Try placing a natural frame around your subject, such as a window, door or arch If you want a particularly beautiful composition, I recommend the rule of thirds, which encourages you to place key elements in one third of the imag




6. Rule of odds

Composition refers to the arrangement of elements in a frame. If you want to take impressive photos, you need to position people and objects carefully and attractively.

Some quick advice:

Avoid placing your subject in the very center of the frame Symmetry usually looks good Try placing a natural frame around your subject, such as a window, door or arch If you want a particularly beautiful composition, I recommend the rule of thirds, which encourages you to place key elements in one third of the image.
for more details click here.





7. Straighten the horizon

A common rookie mistake in smartphone photography is a curved field of view. After all, it’s all too easy to accidentally tilt your phone while taking a photo!

Unfortunately, curved fields of view are a huge problem, and unless you know how to deal with them (either on set or in post-processing), you’ll be stuck with a bunch of bad photos. Fortunately, dealing with a skewed field of view isn’t difficult.
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Just take a moment to open your camera grid. This will display a series of lines on the screen that you can use to align your field of view in the field. You can also deal with skewed fields of view in post-processing. Most editing apps include some sort of straightening option, although you’ll lose pixels in the process, so it’s best to do it on the spot!




8. Use leading lines

Leading lines are the lines that lead the viewer into the picture and draw attention to the main subject.

Guide lines are very powerful when used properly.

When taking photos with your smartphone, look around for streets, buildings, and even furniture that catch your eye. Technically, a guide can be just about anything, from outstretched arms and branches to street signs and buildings.
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So even if you don’t see any obvious lines, I encourage you to keep looking! Once you find the guideline, adjust your position so that it points to the main subject. Your composition will improve in no time!




9. Photograph in natural light

I mentioned the value of natural light earlier in this article, but it’s so important that it deserves a separate discussion.

You see, shooting in natural light has such a pure and clean feel. It looks great, takes great pictures and is ready to use. I love morning and evening light for its golden hue and soft, flattering effect. Cloudy days are also beautiful.

Even the high-contrast light produced by a dazzling sun can look great (especially in black and white). If you’re shooting in heavy shade or at night, you can still use natural light, but you’ll need to use a tripod to avoid blurry images.
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(Luckily, there are plenty of good and inexpensive smartphone tripods to choose from!)




10. Try not to zoom

Don’t zoom unless your camera has a telephoto lens. You see, most zoom functions use digital zoom, it just crops the image to zoom in on the subject. In other words, it doesn’t really get you any closer to the subject. Instead, only pixels are removed. While digital zoom seems convenient, it’s only designed to magnify artifacts and noise. Walk towards the subject for better results (or, better yet, take a more scenic, close-to-the-environment photo).